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Tactical Emergency Casualty Care (TECC)

The Committee for Tactical Emergency Casualty Care used the military battlefield guidelines of Tactical Combat Casualty Care (TCCC) as an evidenced based starting point in the development of civilian specific medical guidelines for high threat operations.

  • TECC focuses on 3 main phases:
  • Phase 1 - Direct Threat Care
  • Phase 2 - Indirect Threat Care
  • Phase 3 - Evacuation Care

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The first phase of care under TCCC is Care Under Fire (CUF). To meet the various operational scenarios and terminology utilized in the civilian sector, the first phase of care under TECC was renamed “Direct Threat Care (DTC).” The priorities of DTC remain relatively unchanged from CUF; emphasis remains on mitigating the threat, moving the wounded to cover or an area of relative safety, and managing massive hemorrhage utilizing tourniquets. Additionally, emphasis was placed on the importance of various rescue and patient movement techniques, as well as rapid positional airway management if operationally feasible. Treatment and operational requirements are the same for all levels of providers during this phase of care.

The second phase of care under TCCC is Tactical Field Care. For the same reasons listed above, this phase was renamed in TECC to be called “Indirect Threat Care.” Indirect Threat Care phase can be initiated once the casualty is in an of relative safety, such as one with proper cover or one that has been cleared but not secured where there is less of chance of rescuers being injured or patients sustaining additional injuries. Similar to TCCC, assessment and treatment priorities in this phase focus on the preventable causes of death as defined by military medical evidence: Major Hemorrhage, Airway, Breathing/Respirations, Circulation, Head & Hypothermia, and Everything Else (MARCHE). Four different levels of providers were assigned to scope of practice and skill sets based on level of training and certification.

The final phase of care under TECC is called “Evacuation Care.” During this phase of care, an effort is being made to move the casualty toward a definitive treatment facility. Most additional interventions during this phase of care are similar to those performed during normal EMS operations.  However, major emphasis is placed on reassessment of interventions and hypothermia management.

Stop the Bleed

This Department of Defense program that was initiated during October 2015 stress the importance of knowing how to react during life threatening bleeding.

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Bleeding Control for the Injured (B-Con) teaches participants the basic life-saving medical interventions, including bleeding control with a tourniquet, bleeding control with gauze packs or topical hemostatic agents, and opening an airway to allow a casualty to breathe. The course is designed for NON tactical law enforcement officers, firefighters, security personnel, teachers and other civilians requiring this basic training.

This 2 ½ hour course teaches participants the basic life-saving medical interventions, including bleeding control with a tourniquet, bleeding control with gauze packs or topical hemostatic agents, and opening an airway to allow a casualty to breathe. The course is designed for NON tactical law enforcement officers, firefighters, security personnel, teachers and other civilians requiring this basic training.

At the completion of the course, participants will be able to:

  • Explain the rationale for early use of a tourniquet for life-threatening extremity bleeding.
  • Demonstrate the appropriate application of a tourniquet to the arm and leg.
  • Describe the progressive strategy for controlling hemorrhage.
  • Describe appropriate airway control techniques and devices.
  • Demonstrate the correct application of a topical hemostatic dressing (combat gauze).

American Heart Association

To build healthier lives, free of cardiovascular disease and stroke.
That single purpose drives all we do.
The need for our work is beyond question.

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Zoticon offers mobile training for a multitude of American Heart Association classes. Group or facility training for BLS, ACLS, PALS and Heartsaver classes starts with a min of 6 students and can be scheduled to meet your needs days, nights and weekends.

What AHA certification do you need?

Click on the certification you need to learn more about the class and to schedule mobile training.

Basic Life Support (Healthcare Provider CPR) Basic Life Support (Healthcare Provider CPR)
Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS) Advanced Cardiac Life Support (ACLS)
Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS) Pediatric Advanced Life Support (PALS)
Heartsaver CPR & First Aid (for Non-Medical Professional) Heartsaver CPR & First Aid (for Non-Medical Professional)
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